Archive for the ‘REO’ Category

SANTA CLARA MARKET STABILITY

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Ohlone/Chynoweth–Almaden (VTA)

Ohlone/Chynoweth–Almaden (VTA) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

For about 3 years we have suffered through the craziest Real Estate Market I have seen in the 25 years I been a Broker here in Silicon Valley. During much of this period properties would be Listed Wed, Open House Sat and Sun, offers accepted Tue/Wed and Sold by Thu, after an average of 24 offers (the record I know of  was 79 offers on a nice 3 bed, 2 bath in South San Jose). This drove prices up a a ridiculous rate.

This was the inevitable result of a wave of overseas investors stocking up on “Cheap” California Real Estate, a surge of well qualified 1st time buyers, and historically low interest rates.

This excess of Buyers (DEMAND) led to a shortage of properties for sale (SUPPLY)

There are 3 significant results of this great Sellers Market:

1. The virtual disappearance of SHORT SALES, and REO (Foreclosure) properties for sale. The rising prices have rescued many homeowners from the UPSIDE DOWN (Negative Equity) situation they had fallen into.

2. A restoration of the Laws of SUPPLY and DEMAND. Over the past 7 years many people were forced to postpone their retirements when most of their Home Equity vanished, and they had to hunker down till the market improved. The rising prices are  allowing them to restart their long term plans to retire and move out of the area.

3. A significant number of MOVE UP BUYERS who got stuck in small houses despite the arrival of small children are now able to get prices which allow them to move up to a more suitable house. They are selling to  buyers who are helped by the huge number of special FIRST TIME BUYER PROGRAMS now available from  City, County, State, and Federal sources. These are greatly enhanced by the fantastic interest rates.

Now here we are in early 2015 and things have returned to something close to normality with inventory for sale, and ready and qualified Buyers pretty much in balance in most of the valley. The exception to this is in those areas with the top rated schools where the boom times are still hot although on a lesser scale.

 

THE DIGNITY MORTGAGE

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About 6 years ago the greedy incompetent Banks managed to effectively take mortgages back to the Dark Ages. Since then the idea of having mortgages designed in the interest of the Borrower has been totally abolished.

Now at last we are hearing stirrings of intelligent ideas coming from the industry.

BEFORE READING THE REST OF THIS ARTTICLE PLEASE BE AWARE THAT THERE ARE NO SUCH THINGS AS “SUB PRIME MORTGAGES”. THERE ARE ONLY “SUB PRIME BORROWERS”.

Housing advocates are pushing for a new type of loan, called the “Dignity Mortgage,” They are approaching bankers and federal regulators proposing this.

The Dignity Mortgage would be geared to applicants who have rebuilt their finances since losing their homes and or jobs during the past 5-6 years, but who have been able to get steady employment and repaired their credit scores since then.

Despite this it is very difficult to get a regular mortgage from the standard lenders at this time says Faith Bautista, who heads the National Asian American Coalition.

The Dignity Mortgage would target Borrowers who had a good credit history prior to the collapse, and have been able to save at least a 10% down payment since then.

Since it would be a higher risk loan, it would come with a higher rate for a higher risk. For example, borrowers would pay 1.25 percentage points above more creditworthy borrowers (e.g. 4.75 percent if more A+ borrowers were paying 3.5 percent), the Los Angeles Times reports.

However, if borrowers made timely payments for five years, the deal could greatly improve.

“At that point, the extra money they had paid in interest would be used to reduce the mortgage balance, and their rate would be cut to whatever borrowers with sterling credit and 20 percent down payments were charged at the time the loan was made,” the Los Angeles Times reports in explaining the proposal.

Source: “New Type of Subprime Loan Pushed,” Los Angeles Times (Jan. 29, 2013)

Loan

Loan (Photo credit: Philip Taylor PT)

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OWNER TO RENTER

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AT LAST, SIGNS OF INTELLIGENT LIFE IN A BANK.

Pilot programs of this kind have been running successfully inside a number of Banks. If implemented more widely this strategy will make a huge positive impact on thousands of families.

CitiMortgage announced the launch of the Home Rental Program, a program designed to provide an alternative to foreclosure and allow eligible borrowers to stay in their homes.
The Home Rental Program will be managed by Carrington Capital Management, LLC and Carrington Mortgage Services, LLC. CitiMortgage and Carrington developed the program as a pilot.
Under the program, the eligible borrower transfers ownership of the property to a vehicle established by Carrington Capital and its joint venture partner, Oaktree Capital Management, L.P. A lease will then be established for the property at a manageable monthly payment.
Lease payments will be determined by local market rates but are expected to be lower than the borrower’s mortgage obligation. Carrington will work with borrowers to establish a length for each lease.
The program will be tested in six of the hardest-hit markets to evaluate its effectiveness: Arizona, California, Texas, Florida, Nevada, and Georgia. Carrington will contact homeowners who meet eligibility requirements.
In order to be eligible for the program, candidates must: Occupy the property; owe more than their home is worth; be delinquent for 120 days; and be unable or ineligible to receive an affordable loan modification while still having the resources to make monthly rent payments. In addition, candidates must have a loan in the pilot portfolio serviced by Carrington.
To implement the program, CitiMortgage has transferred the ownership of loans in its portfolio through the sale of $158 million in mortgages to the Carrington/Oaktree partnership.
“We’re looking forward to working on this important initiative with CitiMortgage and our partner, Oaktree Capital Management,” said Bruce Rose, founder and CEO of Carrington. “Offering alternatives for borrowers looking to stay in their homes and simultaneously relieving their distress is core to the operating principles of our firm and will help substantially in the overall housing market recovery.”

FORECLOSURE/SHORT SALE TAX HELP

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In 2007. the Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act of 2007 was passed, helping many underwater homeowners avoid taxes on the amount of debt that their lender forgives. Even though the homeowner doesn’t see any of the money from the short sale, the lender’s loss is considered the homeowner’s gain and the lender issues a 1099 reporting that amount as income.

That “income” would ordinarily be taxable, but the 2007 Act wiped out tax liability for many homeowners who short sale their homes between 2007 and 2012.

It is possible that Congress could move to extend the tax protection. However, those who are considering short sales may wish to be cautious and begin negotiating the process now. Listing the home, finding a buyer and negotiating with the short sale can take months.

BUYING AFTER DEED IN LIEU OR SHORT SALE

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Until recently the only hope of buying again after losing you house through default was with FHA, and for many that will still be the best voice.

 However, a new option is now possible.

The much maligned Fannie Mae is now allowing some people who avoided Foreclosure through either a Short Sale or a Deed in lieu of Foreclosure to get a regular Conventional Mortgage again.

The good news is that Fannie Mae will buy those loans from Banks that make them. It does not mean that all Banks will offer them.

Banks that do offer these loans will typically apply tougher standards than normal to offset what they might consider an increased risk.

To qualify you must have had good credit before and since the Short Sale / Deed in Lieu of Foreclosure.

If you can meet this requirement here are the times after which you will have a good chance to buy your own home again (at vastly lower prices and interest rates than you had before).

TWO (2) Years up to Maximum 80% Loan to Value | 20% Down Payment

FOUR (4) Years up to Maximum 90% Loan to Value | 10% Down Payment – Subject to Private Mortgage Insurance underwriting guidelines.

SEVEN (7) Years above 90% Loan to Value | with less than 10% Down Payment – Subject to Private Mortgage Insurance underwriting guidelines.

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FROM BUYER to FORECLOSURE to RENTER.

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Many strange things have happened these past few years but here’s one of the most interesting.

John Doe, his wife, and 4 children live in a small city North of San Francisco and had rented till around 2006 when they bought a nice house with more space than they had ever had. All was well till John lost his job in 2009, and 10 months later lost his house to Foreclosure.

He now lives in that same house as a Renter paying $1,800/month rent versus the $2,500/month and mortgage he previously paid as its owner.

This is the result of new type of Real Estate Investor buying multiple Bay Area foreclosed homes to be rented both for short term profit, and long term Capital Gains.

In this case the Investor is McKinley Capital Partners who have joined with a New York hedge fund who have so far bought about 300 homes and plan to add up to 500 more.

Some very basic research has shown me that this process is replicated in many other markets where the values have stabilized and an upward trend is very likely in the near future.

HOMEPATH.

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FANNIE MAE’s GOOD DEED DEAL

FANNIE  MAE owns a good percentage of all Foreclosed homes (R.E.O’s) in todays market, and for many reasons they are more agressive in trying to get them sold.

HOMEPATH is the fantastic program they have developed to make this happen.

HOMEPATH MORTGAGE allows ANY Buyer (not just 1st timers) to buy a Fannie Mae owned house with:

0 LOW DOWN PAYMENT. 3% which can be from Savings, Gift, Grant (see CHP at http://mccordrealtyservices.com/wp-admin/post.php?action=edit&post=542 ) or virtually any other source.

0 NO LENDER REQUESTED APPRAISAL.

0 NO MORTGAGE INSURANCE (P.M.I.).

0 EXPANDED SELLER CREDITS FOR Closing Costs.

0 FLEXIBLE TERMS i.e. 30 yr fixed, 3,5,7, Year Adjustables etc

o O.K. FOR PERSONAL OR INVESTMENT properties.

0 VERY FLEXIBLE CONDO REQUIREMENT (more so than FHA).

IN ADDITION

There is the HOMEPATH RENOVATION MORTGAGE which is designed for properties needing moderate renovation work. As well as all the benefits of the regular HOMEPATH  progran this provides up to $35,000 cash for Repairs and Remodelling.

This amount is added to the regular mortgage based on the value of the property once the work is completed.

Any active Buyer should be sure to check any available houses covered by the HOMEPATH Programs.

For more information contact me at bmccord@rwnetwork.com or scroll down the the next item here.

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SILICON VALLEY Real Estate UPDATE

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The real estate crisis has gutted house prices, tipped millions into foreclosure, and rattled the global economy to its core. But for many would-be home buyers, the historic boom and bust have been a blessing in disguise. During the first half of the previous decade, easy credit and speculative excitement worked to make houses increasingly expensive. By the fourth quarter of 2005, median home prices had reached 2.77 times median household incomes. That is sharply higher than the 1.92 average of the 15 years ending in 2003 and too expensive for many families. But the subsequent crash in home prices–values have fallen roughly 30 percent at the national level from their 2006 peaks–has helped restore affordability to this once inflated market. By the third quarter of 2009, the price-to-income ratio–a key measure of housing affordability–had fallen below its 15-year average, to 1.84 for the nation as a whole.

Beginning Jan 2010 Silicon Valley Counties (North Santa Clara and Southern Alameda) sales prices have stabilized and some areas are now seeing small increases.

Apart from this being a normal process indicating the last stages of any financial cycle, it has been significantly driven by 5 major sources:

  1. 1st Time Buyer Tax Credits which ended mid 2010.
  2. Extension of FHA and V/A maximum loan limits for High Priced Zip codes.
  3. Historically low interest rates.
  4. Huge increases in the number of 1st Time Buyer programs from Federal, State, County, City, and Employment specific sources. These continue to increase and improve.
  5. Major reductions in Bank Owned (REO), and Short Sale properties coming to market as Banks have beefed up programs designed to keep people in their homes where possible. This has allowed more normal conditions to have control of sales prices.

NOTE: I’m only describing my local Market here in Silicon Valley. I know conditions in other areas have been, and continue to be hit worse than us.  

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Typical Buyer Questions #1

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Here’s a question from a client who has just had an offer accepted on a bank owned (REO)  property.

Question.

Hi Bill, I was talking to a friend about REO and wanted to get your expertise on the matter.  She mentioned recently there were news about how bank were approving foreclosure while owners were doing a refi and other things, so at the end of the day even the bank didn’t own title to the property.  The loan is sold off to multiple lenders and Title is unclear.  Have you heard about it?

My Answer.

Hi Lisa,   As with many things described as “News” in ourMass Media this is just another Urban Legend. In this case one that shows absolutely no knowledge of reality. What it is talking about is a mixture of different situations based on rumours and hearsay, in all cases relating to either Short Sales, or loan modifications, usually from the 29 States where “mortgage” law is different than in California.

It has nothing to do with REO properties which by definition are fully owned by a Bank. There is no other “Owner”. Title is in the name of the Bank and will be delivered by them to the new owner as in any other purchase. An owners Title Insurance  policy will, as always, be paid for by the current owner (the Bank) and given to the new owner through Escrow. There is nothing different today than when you bought your house.

New questions are allways welcome at bmccord@rwnetwork.com

From: Lisa Ly

Sent: Thursday, December 23, 2010 8:11 AM

To: bmccord@rwnetwork.com

Subject: REO Question

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Reality vs. Partisan Pundits. No Contest

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The Administrations well meant efforts to make it possible for many homeowners to avoid foreclosure has stirred up a hornet’s nest among some media commentators.

The Plan described at http://www.makinghomeaffordable.gov/ uses up to $75 billion to provide incentives to holders of FANIE MAE and FREDDY MAC loans to work with Borrowers to refinance, or modify existing problem loans, rather than simply go ahead and foreclose.

This is a classic version of the glass ½ full, or ½ empty. Typically, in our current exclusively partisan media, the answer is dictated solely by political affiliation regardless of the facts.

This is unfortunate because there are legitimate reasons for supporting, opposing, or, better still, improving the current process.

One the one hand it is a legitimate effort to try to help Joe Public get through a situation brought about by failures in our economic systems. Given the Trillions of dollars being ploughed back to the very people who caused this situation, the $75 Billion allocated to this program is peanuts.

On the other hand there is a valid argument to be made that subsidizing refinances, or modifying problem loans, is simply putting off an inevitable final default. This can often hurt the very people it purports to help by having them use up scarce funds in a doomed attempt to save an impossible situation, rather than simply give the property back to the Lender and getting  on with life.

The December report on the status of this program provides ample ammunition for both schools of thought, and the regulators have shifted emphasis to try to deal with the problems showing up.

The summary shows that 728,000 loan modifications are already in the required trial phase. Unfortunately only 31,382 have completed that phase and have become permanent, saving homeowners an average of $550 per month. The low rate at which Trials become Permanent  is a serious problem raising concerns that a significant number of these modifications are simply allowing the Banks to delay acknowledging the number of bad loans on their books and to avoid taking the losses on to their Balance Sheets.

If that is true then the inevitable result will be a longer period of foreclosed properties coming to market as these failed modifications fall apart.

As with most things there is not a simple answer, but on balance I come down on the side of giving the program a fair shot. This is based mostly on my view that given the countless billions we have poured into supporting the financial institutions that caused the problems,  a little effort to give similar assistance to the victims is not unreasonable.