Posts Tagged ‘Positive facts’

MCC. FREE MONEY FROM THE IRS

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Many States, Counties, and Cities have great programs to help 1st Time home buyers, but few if any are better then the Federal Governments Mortgage Credit Certificate (MCC) program.
This turbo charges the existing TAX DEDUCTION for mortgage interest by allowing 15% of it to be taken as a TAX CREDIT.
Here’s an example:
If you pay mortgage interest of $24,000/year you can take 15% of that ($3,600) and deduct it dollar for dollar from your total tax liability.
To put it simply; if your total tax bill was $20,000 it will be reduced to $16,500. You have now got a tax free pay raise of $250/m.
You can now tell your employer to reduce the amount they take from your paystub so you get the benefit of this right away with an extra $250/month in your pocket.
This program is administered by the Counties, and your Mortgage Broker/Bank, but be aware that not all of them are familiar with it. Be prepared to educate them.

NEGATIVE EQUITY REFINANCING

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The Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP) is now available to 5 million homeowners who have a solid payment history on an existing mortgage owned by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. Normally, these borrowers would be unable to refinance because their homes have lost value, pushing their current loan-to-value ratios above 100%. Under the HARP Program, many of them will now be eligible to refinance their loan to take advantage of today’s lower mortgage rates or to refinance an adjustable-rate mortgage into a more stable mortgage, such as a 30-year fixed HARP loan.
The HARP Program and HARP 2.0 are available now.
For a full description of this great program and to see if your loan qualifies go to http://www.harploan.org/faq.html
Here are some recent statistics to illustrate the success of HARP 2:
o. One in 7 of all refinances in the 1st quarter of 2012 was through HARP.
o. The number of refinances in the 1st quarter was double that for the last quarter of 2011 driven by a sharp increase in those with above 105% Loan to Value (LTV)
o. FHFA officials attribute the increase to the removal of the loan-to-value (LTV) ceiling for borrowers who refinance into fixed-rate loans and the elimination — or lowering — of fees for certain borrowers.
o. In March, there were nearly 80,000 HARP refinances, a quarter of them on loans with LTVs greater than 105 percent.
o. More than 4,400 loans with LTVs greater than 125 percent were refinanced since the beginning of the year; over half these loans were refinanced in the states of California, Florida, and Arizona.
• The number of loans refinanced through HARP in the first quarter of 2012 nearly doubled compared with the number of loans refinanced through HARP in the fourth quarter of 2011, driven by a sharp increase in the number of loans refinanced above 105 percent LTV.
• In March, there were nearly 80,000 HARP refinances, a quarter of them on loans with LTVs greater than 105 percent.
• More than 4,400 loans with LTVs greater than 125 percent were refinanced since the beginning of the year; over half these loans were refinanced in the states of California, Florida, and Arizona.

Praise Where It’s Due

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A small but very welcome glow of sanity from a historically well run Bank.

After acquiring $117.3 billion dollars worth of option adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs) in its acquisition of Wachovia last year, banking giant Wells Fargo is now practicing a rare but effective loan modification strategy: the cramdown.

Through September of this year, Wells Fargo has forgiven an average of $46,000 on approximately 43,500 high-risk loans in its portfolio. The typical debt reduction is around 20% of the loan principal, though in rare cases Wells Fargo has cut as much as 30%. Reports put the six-month default rate of loans modified by Wells Fargo at 15-20%, less than half the current rate of 40% suffered by the rest of industry’s extend-and-pretend modifications.

Debt reduction is only one of many tools Wells Fargo is using to aid its distressed borrowers, and is currently not being used as a blanket fix for all underwater homeowners.

My Opinion: While this is a national story and certainly only a very small slice of the current problem pie, a mortgage lender taking into account the need for principal reduction is a big acknowledgement that the underwater state of many homeowners’ mortgages require this type of treatment. This is something other lenders and Congress need to understand when considering the mortgage quandary. Continuing to “kick the can down the road” with “extend and pretend” modifications will do nothing to solve the massive negative equity problem. The fact that the small glimmers of hope — in the form of cramdowns — are coming from a lender and not the regulators really speaks to the hands-tied, head-buried-in-the-sand mentality which must be overcome if we are to move ahead with a recovery.

Re: Wells Fargo Cuts as Much as 30 Percent in Principal from the Wall Street Journal

Some Positives

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I don’t deny we’re going through tough financial times. However, I would like to suggest some positives amidst all the gloom and doom emanating from our so called “experts” in the media. Let us remember it is their job to sell more advertising, not to give us the factual news.

 

1. 93% of all U.S. Mortgages are being paid on time every month.

2. Mortgage interest rates are the lowest in 5 years.

3. For the first time in many years it is a Buyer’s market.

4. There is an ever increasing number of great 1st time buyer programs being     created by Federal, and State Governments, and from the Counties and Cities in and around Silicon Valley.

5. There is still an up to $8,000 tax credit on offer for 1st time home buyers.

6. Any intelligent Seller is going to be willing to give credits toward Buyers closing cost.

 

Now, if we can just get more of this news out we can start restoring normality into our business.