Posts Tagged ‘San Francisco Bay Area’

CALIFORNIA IS NOT SILICON VALLEY

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English: This is one of the huge welcoming sig...

English: This is one of the huge welcoming signs for Google plex in the silicon valley. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

CALIFORNIA IS NOT SILICON VALLEY

The Market Statistics fiasco

I’m continually answering client’s questions about mass media, or on line reports (Case Schiller etc) which claim to give “information” about the California Real Estate Market and which contradict the information I give them.

Here’s the reality:

REAL ESTATE IS LOCAL

Data covering the whole of California is totally useless to anyone considering Buying or Selling property in Silicon Valley.

To get useful information about a specific area why not go to a source which deals ONLY with that area, and has ACCURATE and RELEVANT information on it.

A competent and tech savvy Realtor has direct access to all relevant data bases and can easily provide accurate and current data for individual homes, neighborhoods, Cities, and Counties within minutes, at  no cost to a Client.

Much of this data is either not available to the general public, or costs inordinate time and money to an individual.

THE MUTIPLE OFFER PROBLEM

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THE MUTIPLE OFFER PROBLEM

To Bid or Not to Bid?

In Silicon Valley we are now about 12 months into the latest outbreak of “Multiple Offer Syndrome”.

English: This is one of the huge welcoming sig...

English: This is one of the huge welcoming signs for Google plex in the silicon valley. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A large majority of homes are currently being listed on Wed, hold Open Houses Sat and Sun, schedule offers for mid week, and are sold to the best of multiple offers by Friday.

The reason for this is very simple.

There are too many Buyers chasing too few houses. This is a direct result of historically low interest rates which will not start rising till early 1014 at the soonest.

As any Economist will tell you, in a free market the solution to this is equally simple. The law of Supply and Demand will automatically correct the problem.

If there is a shortage of any product more of that product will be brought to market.

In this case where there is a shortage of Houses for Sale, prices will be driven up. As this happens more homeowners will decide to sell, and Builders will accelerate getting new homes into the market. Obviously these things do not happen quickly so you can be sure the current price escalation will continue for at least 12 months and then probably just slow down to the historical norm for Silicon Valley i.e. 5% per year.

 

Looking west over northern San Jose (downtown ...

Looking west over northern San Jose (downtown is at far left) and other parts of Silicon Valley (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

If you are a Buyer who has several times lost out to higher bids you might wonder if it’s better to hold off till the market turns.

Consider the following:

Demand will not slow down for at least 12 months.

Each new sale sets a higher price for the next one in the same area.

In 12 months time it’s a near certainty that interest rates will be higher.

When things slow down and you decide to come back into the market you will be paying 12% to 15% more than today. (Based on price increases over the past 18 months in Silicon Valley.

In the meantime you are paying close to cost of a mortgage (which has major tax benefits) for rent which gives those same tax benefits to a Landlord.

Think carefully before holding off.

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TIME TO BUY???

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Are you a potential 1st time buyer living in Californias Silicon Valley, and expect to live in your new home for at least 5 years/? YES YES YES.

0. Prices in our Valley have pretty much stabilized.

0 Interest rates are at all time lows.

0 There are multiple 1st Time Buyer programs from Cities, Countys, State, and Federal Governments. These can provide down payment assistance, and significantly reduce the cost of owning.

If your answer to my 1st question is negative then the answer is probably NO NO NO.

If you believe that prices are going to drop further and you plan to wait and buy at the bottom, please let me know how you will be able spot that bottom before it has already happened.

 

 

 

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SILICON VALLEY Real Estate UPDATE

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The real estate crisis has gutted house prices, tipped millions into foreclosure, and rattled the global economy to its core. But for many would-be home buyers, the historic boom and bust have been a blessing in disguise. During the first half of the previous decade, easy credit and speculative excitement worked to make houses increasingly expensive. By the fourth quarter of 2005, median home prices had reached 2.77 times median household incomes. That is sharply higher than the 1.92 average of the 15 years ending in 2003 and too expensive for many families. But the subsequent crash in home prices–values have fallen roughly 30 percent at the national level from their 2006 peaks–has helped restore affordability to this once inflated market. By the third quarter of 2009, the price-to-income ratio–a key measure of housing affordability–had fallen below its 15-year average, to 1.84 for the nation as a whole.

Beginning Jan 2010 Silicon Valley Counties (North Santa Clara and Southern Alameda) sales prices have stabilized and some areas are now seeing small increases.

Apart from this being a normal process indicating the last stages of any financial cycle, it has been significantly driven by 5 major sources:

  1. 1st Time Buyer Tax Credits which ended mid 2010.
  2. Extension of FHA and V/A maximum loan limits for High Priced Zip codes.
  3. Historically low interest rates.
  4. Huge increases in the number of 1st Time Buyer programs from Federal, State, County, City, and Employment specific sources. These continue to increase and improve.
  5. Major reductions in Bank Owned (REO), and Short Sale properties coming to market as Banks have beefed up programs designed to keep people in their homes where possible. This has allowed more normal conditions to have control of sales prices.

NOTE: I’m only describing my local Market here in Silicon Valley. I know conditions in other areas have been, and continue to be hit worse than us.  

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